Work More Efficiently in Developmental Biology With Stereo Microscopy: Zebrafish, Medaka, and Xenopus

February 16, 2016

Among the aquatic model organisms used in molecular and developmental biology the most prominent are the zebrafish (genus species: Danio rerio), medaka or japanese rice fish (genus species: Oryzias latipes), and african clawed frog (genus species: Xenopus laevis).

These aquatic vertebrate model organisms are widely applied to study molecular processes of development and as disease models. To study these molecular mechanisms, proteins of interest are fluorescently labeled andobserved in the developing organism at the cellular or sub-cellular level over the course of hours or days.

This report gives useful information to scientists and technicians which can help improve their daily laboratory work by making the steps of transgenesis, fluorescent screening, and functional imaging more efficient.

Fig.: Zebrafish larva with myl7:AmCyan, lmo2:dsRED2, drl:EGFP and Rottermann contrast

 

 

 

Leica M205 FA images of a transgenic zebrafish larva which is a combination of myl7:AmCyan, labeling the heart muscle blue, lmo2:dsRED2, labeling the
blood and blood vessels red, and drl:EGFP, labeling all circulatory system cells green.

Efficient and reliable microscopy is needed for each of these three common steps - transgenesis, fluorescent screening, functional imaging - when doing routine work with aquatic model organisms, such as zebrafish.

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