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Claudia Müller


Claudia Müller studied at Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany, and the University of Birmingham, UK, graduating with a degree in English and Philosophy. After she spent eight years at a Frankfurt-based communications agency with a focus on integrated communications in B2B, B2C and corporate communications online and offline, Claudia worked in corporate communications at Leica Microsystems for four years. Her current focus are pipetool technologies.

  • How to Turn Microscope Workplaces Ergonomic

    Microscopes are tools that affect those who work with them every day. They can be highly demanding for the human body, requiring concentration and a lot of steady activity from many of our muscles. In this interview, Clinton Smith, Senior Product Manager at Leica Microsystems, talks about how to relieve possible tension and strain and how to create ergonomic workplaces to help microscope users work in comfort and how to increase productivity.
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  • Factors to Consider when Selecting Student Microscopes for Schools and Universities

    Selecting educational microscopes is not an easy task for teachers. The microscopes must stand up to daily use by not always careful hands, be constantly up and running, and fit the budget requirements. Especially with student microscopes, practical aspects play a role: Size, weight, cabling, and design are important in their daily use – and this should be taken into consideration even before the equipment and accessories of the microscopes enter the decision process. If chosen carefully, educational microscopes will open windows to a cosmos of minute detail which delight young minds in schools and universities – and ideally keeps them fascinated enough to make science their profession.
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  • Definitions of Basic Technical Terms for Digital Microscope Cameras and Image Analysis

    Most microscopes today are operated with a camera. The characteristics of the camera often decide whether the acquired image will reveal what a researcher wants to see. But when diving into camera terminology, the technical terms can be overwhelming. We have compiled the most important terms with a concise explanation to provide orientation.
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  • What Makes sCMOS Microscope Cameras so Popular?

    sCMOS cameras are more sensitive and are capable of much higher acquisition speed than cameras with other sensor types. Even though CCD cameras are widely used in live cell imaging and time-lapse recordings, researchers are often concerned that their camera does not detect faint signals. In this interview, Dr. Karin Schwab, Product Manager at Leica Microsystems, talks about the characteristics of sCMOS cameras and how researchers benefit from the latest camera sensor technology.
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  • How to do a Proper Cell Culture Quick Check

    In order to successfully work with mammalian cell lines, they must be grown under controlled conditions and require their own specific growth medium. In addition, to guarantee consistency their growth must be monitored at regular intervals. This article describes a typical workflow for subculturing an adherent cell line with detailed illustrations of all of the necessary steps.
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  • A Good Place for Materials Scientists and Mineralogists to prepare their EM Samples

    In June 2014, the Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC) of the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris became a Leica reference lab for EM Sample Preparation with equipment like the Leica EM TXP target surfacing systems and the Leica EM TIC 3X ion beam milling system. In the interview, Imène Estève, engineer at the Centre National de Recherches Scientifiques (CNRS) and head of the SEM-FIB national facility, in charge of running the lab, tells us about how this cooperation has developed.
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  • Five Advantages of Inverted Over Upright Microscopes in Industrial Applications

    With inverted microscopes, you look at samples from below since their optics are placed under the sample, with upright microscopes you look at samples from above. Traditionally, inverted microscopes are used for life science research, because gravity makes samples sink to the bottom of a holder with aqueous solution and you don’t see a lot from above.
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  • Investing in Ergonomically Designed Microscope Workplaces Pays Off

    To do their best at work, people have to have a feeling of physical wellbeing: they are more attentive and motivated and more productive for longer periods of time. As ergonomically designed workplaces are conducive to physical wellbeing, ergonomics makes a direct contribution to the operating result, reducing sick days and enhancing productivity.
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