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European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg, Germany

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  • The Bimodally Expressed MicroRNA miR‐142 Gates Exit from Pluripotency

    A stem cell's decision to self‐renew or differentiate is thought to critically depend on signaling cues provided by its environment. It is unclear whether stem cells have the intrinsic capacity to control their responsiveness to environmental signals that can be fluctuating and noisy. Using a novel single‐cell microRNA activity reporter, we show that miR‐142 is bimodally expressed in embryonic stem cells, creating two states indistinguishable by pluripotency markers.
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  • Cryo-electron Microscopy of Tubular Arrays of HIV-1 Gag Resolves Structures Essential for Immature Virus Assembly

    HIV-1 undergoes a two-step assembly process. First, an immature noninfectious particle is assembled, which leaves the infected cell. Second, the structural protein, Gag, is cleaved in the virus by the viral protease, and this leads to formation of the infectious virus. We have assembled part of HIV-1 Gag in vitro to form immature virus-like tubular protein arrays, and have solved a subnanometer-resolution structure of these arrays by using cryo-EM and tomography. This structure reveals interactions of the C-terminal capsid domain of Gag that are critical for HIV-1 assembly.
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  • Webinar: Using FIT Probes and Super-Resolution Microscopy to Decipher Steps of mRNP Assembly in Developing Oocytes

    In this webinar, presented by Dr. Imre Gaspar of the Developmental Biology Unit at EMBL, you will learn: importance of mRNA localization and function of mRNPs, advantages of using fluorogenic FIT probes to visualize mRNPs in vivo and in fixed specimen, and how super-resolution microscopy can identify factors required for mRNP biogenesis.
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  • Probes that FIT RNA

    We have been developing new tools based on fluorogenic forced intercalation (FIT) probes for RNA detection quantification and interference in biological samples. Upon duplex formation with target nucleic acids, the base surrogates TO dye increases its quantum yield and brightness substantially (>10 fold).
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  • Webinar: Correlative Fluorescence and (Cryo-) Electron Microscopy

    In this webinar, you will learn how you can identify objects of interest based on their fluorescent signal, and then find and image them in 3D in the transmission electron microscope using correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) methods.
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  • Abstracts of the 5th European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 5th Super-Resolution User Club Meeting was held in collaboration with Professor Kees Jalink and The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) in Amsterdam. Having the meeting at a location where super-resolution microscopy is used on a daily basis makes a big difference, offering participants the chance to use live cells for workshops and see systems working in their true environments. Thanks also to the scientists that supported the meeting by coming and giving talks. As super-resolution continues to grow in importance in research, we recognize the need to come together to network, share information and experiences. Here we present the abstracts of the talks.
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  • Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Cancer research unsing multiphoton microscopy and 3D electron microscopy. Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task.
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  • Cryo CLEM – the Combination of Cryo Fluorescence Microscopy with Cryo Electron Microscopy

    Many biological insights can be obtained by combining the power of Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) with that of Electron Microscopy (EM) to study the same sample – this is called Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM). In FM, specific proteins can be labelled and identified, and their dynamics and interactions can be visualized in fixed or living cells.
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  • Video Interview with Rainer Pepperkok

    Rainer Pepperkok is Head of the Advanced Light Microscopy Core Facility and Senior Scientist at the EMBL in Heidelberg (Germany). In the course of his studies he is interested in membrane traffic of the early secretory pathway in mammalian cells which he is trying to analyze with the help of most modern light microcopy techniques.
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  • Abstracts of the 4th European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 4th Super-Resolution User Club Meeting was held in collaboration with Christian Eggeling and the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford, UK. Here we present the abstracts of the talks and interviews with participants.
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  • Sample Preparation for GSDIM Localization Microscopy – Protocols and Tips

    The widefield super-resolution technique GSDIM (Ground State Depletion followed by individual molecule return) is a localization microscopy technique that is capable of resolving details as small as 20 nanometers. GSDIM is suitable for a wide range of samples.
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  • Super-Resolution Microscopy Gives New Insights into Nuclear Pore Complex Organization

    The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) is a large complex in the nuclear membrane, representing the gate to the eukaryotic genetic makeup. Because of this outstanding function the structure of the NPC is of great interest. Anna Szymborska, scientist at the EMBL in Heidelberg, comments on her resaerch results and the potential of Ground State Depletion microscopy (GSD) for protein complex analysis in the following interview.
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  • Abstracts of the 2nd European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 2nd meeting of the Leica Super-resolution User club was held from September 25 to 27, 2012 in collaboration with the Science for Life Laboratory at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. With a mixture of engaging talks by key experts in the field of super-resolution microscopy and stimulating discussion sessions, the meeting proved as popular as last year’s event, attracting a wide range of scientists interested in both confocal and widefield super-resolution and sample preparation techniques.
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  • Webinar: Morphogenesis

    Morphogenesis – literally “shape creation” – is responsible for the diversity of biological shapes that make up Darwin’s “endless forms most beautiful and wonderful”. In recent years, the combination of cutting edge microscopy and molecular approaches in developmental, cell, and molecular biology have provided an increasingly in-depth view of how organisms (and all of their integral parts) form from a single cell. In this exciting webinar...
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  • Webinar: Amplify the Power of Imaging

    High Content Screening (HCS) is the answer to the change from descriptive to quantitative fluorescence imaging in life sciences research.
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