Contact & Support
Header Image
  • Live-cell Imaging Techniques

    The understanding of complex and/or fast cellular dynamics is an important step for exploring biological processes. Therefore, today’s life science research is increasingly focusing on dynamic processes like cell migration, morphological changes of cells, organs or whole animals and physiological (e.g. changes of intracellular ion composition) events in living specimens in real time.
    Read article
  • Differential Interference Contrast

    The examination of live unstained biological specimens often suffers from poor contrast and therefore bad visibility of the specimen. Thick specimens in particular, such as brain slices, show up as nothing more than light grey structures instead of single cells. This tutorial explains the optical elements in the light path and the operating mode of DIC (differential interference contrast) on the example of an inverted and motorized high-end research light microscope which can be used for transmitted light contrasting methods and fluorescence microscopy.
    Read article
  • Factors to Consider When Selecting a Stereo Microscope

    Stereo microscopes are often nicknamed the workhorse of the lab or the production department. Users spend many hours behind the ocular inspecting, observing, documenting or dissecting samples. Which factors need to be considered when selecting...
    Read article
  • Video Tutorial: How to Optimize Sample Preparation for GSD Microscopy

    This video tutorial presents a reliable way to produce samples for super-resolution GSD imaging with a special focus on the mounting step. Stable and flat mounting of the coverslip increases the performance of the overall system, leading to an improved resolution of the GSD image.
    Read article
  • Webinar: SEM Sample Preparation Using Ion Beam Slope Cutting

    ASM International and Leica Microsystems presented this free webinar on how to achieve high quality cross-sections of any material. Revealing the internal structures of the sample with scarcely any deformation or damage remains an industry challenge. New technologies allow for production of cross sections of hard/soft, porous, heat sensitive, brittle and heterogeneous material for Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Microstructure Analysis (EDS, WDS, Auger, EBSD) and, AFM investigations. Learn how you can achieve high quality cross-sections during this free webinar.
    Read article
  • Ratiometric Imaging

    Many fundamental functions of a cell strongly depend on delicate, but nevertheless dynamic balances of ions (e.g. calcium, magnesium), voltage potentials and pH between the cell’s cytosol and the surrounding extracellular space. Ratiometric imaging allows reliable estimations of ion concentrations and pH or voltage changes by measuring fluorophore emission shifts.
    Read article
  • Ratiometric Imaging Needs a Specialized Setup

    Ratiometric imaging is widely used to study highly dynamic intracellular ion, voltage or pH changes. The most common application, however, is calcium imaging. Ratiometric imaging is also used for investigating cellular networks, where e.g. relative calcium concentrations are passed among cells or different cell types dynamically change ion, voltage or pH levels. Also FRET assays can considerably benefit from ratiometric imaging, as the signal-to-noise-ratio is greatly improved.
    Read article
  • Beam Splitting

    Fluorescence Microscopy usually employs incident light illumination. This requires a device that directs the light for illumination into the sample and transmits the light emitted by the sample to the detection system. In the past, various types of mirrors were the only option. Today, the acousto optical beam splitter serves best for the task.
    Read article
  • Spectral Imaging

    To separate fractions of the emission for recording channels that reproduce the emission of individual fluorochromes, it is necessary to spatially disperse the emission spectrally. This is possible by employing dichroic mirrors or a genuine dispersive element like a prism or a grating.
    Read article
  • Confocal Excitation

    Fluorescence excitation needs specifically colored light. In confocal microscopy, multiline lasers or laser batteries are classically used. This requires devices that pick the requested lines fitting the currently employed fluorochromes. Intensity control is a second task that must be accomplished.
    Read article
  • Subcellular Localization of AKT and Tubulin using Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Stimulated Emission Depletion microscopy, or STED nanoscopy, is a technique that uses the non-linear de-excitation of fluorescent dyes to overcome the resolution limit imposed by diffraction encountered with standard confocal laser scanning microscopes and conventional far-field optical microscopes[1]. Compared to traditional confocal microscopy, STED offers exceptional improvements in resolution allowing visualization of cellular events at unprecedented levels.
    Read article
  • Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and its Offspring

    FRAP (Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching) can be used to study cellular protein dynamics: For visualization the protein of interest is fused to a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent dye. A region of interest (ROI) can be monitored applying a high amount of light to bleach the fluorescence within the ROI. The following illumination with low light conditions provides insight into the redistribution of molecules via recovery of fluorescence.
    Read article
  • Webinar: Applications, Labeling Strategies and Fluorophores for Super-Resolution

    The free online webinar on super-resolution presented by Leica Microsystems in association with Microscopy & Analysis took place on Tuesday, 15 November 2011. Register and view the webinar on demand.
    Read article
  • Technical Cleanliness in the Production of Automotive Components

    Interview with Dr. Michael Härtel, head of the materials testing laboratory at Continental Automotive GmbH, Powertrain Division, Limbach-Oberfrohna, Germany
    Read article
  • Neuroscience and Microscopy

    Neurobiology, the science of nerves and the brain, has mainly been driven forward in the last 200 years by microscopic investigations. The structures of cellular and subcellular structures, interaction and the three-dimensional assembly of neurons were made visible by various microscopy techniques. The optical microscope is also a necessary tool for visualizing micropipettes in electrophysiological measurements. Thirdly, many types of functional imaging are performed by means of optical microscopy.
    Read article
  • Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)

    The Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) phenomenon offers techniques that allow studies of interactions in dimensions below the optical resolution limit. FRET describes the transfer of the energy from an excited state of a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule. Unlike absorption or emission of photons, FRET is a non-radiative energy exchange and consequently not a variation of light-matter interactions.
    Read article
  • FLIM-FRET in Solutions

    FRET efficiency can be measured based on fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM). FLIM-FRET allows analysis of molecular interactions both in vitro and in vivo. This article describes the use of FLIM in the time domain (TCSPC) to measure FRET in vitro in a biochemical assay using a Cerulean-Citrine construct.
    Read article
  • An Introduction to CARS Microscopy

    CARS overcomes the drawbacks of conventional staining methods by the intrinsic characteristics of the method. CARS does not require labeling because it is highly specific to molecular compounds which are based on vibrational contrast and chemical selectivity. The crucial advantage of this method is that the sample remains almost unaffected. With CARS, new samples that could not be stained due to unavailability of the appropriate dye are now accessible.
    Read article
  • Step by Step Guide to the Molecular Basics of CARS Microscopy

    CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) microscopy is a dye-free method which images structures by displaying the characteristic intrinsic vibrational contrast of their molecules. The crucial advantage of this method is that the sample remains almost unaffected. This tutorial explains the molecular basics on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering.
    Read article
  • How Widefield Super-Resolution GSDIM Images are Created

    The localization microscopy technique GSDIM is a proven technology to achieve super-resolution images with a resolution of up to 20 nm. In the following tutorial we will describe the basic principles and features of GSDIM.
    Read article
  • Step by Step Guide to the Molecular Basics of GSDIM Microscopy

    Ground state depletion microscopy followed by individual molecule return (GSDIM) is a super-resolution technique based on single molecule localization (Localization Microscopy). To localize single molecules and create a high resolution image the ensemble of overlapping fluorophores (in a diffraction-limited setup) has to be broken up. Individual fluorophores must be temporally "separated" to allow high precision detection of single molecules. This tutorial will explain the molecular basics of GSDIM.
    Read article
  • Step by Step Guide to Hybrid Detection and Photon Counting

    This tutorial explains the underlying hybrid detection technology and compares it to photomultiplier technology. The implications of hybrid detection design for imaging and photon counting are discussed. The tutorial closes with a brief summary of photon counting in the context of imaging.
    Read article
  • CARS Publication List

    CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) microscopy is a dye-free method which images structures by displaying the characteristic intrinsic vibrational contrast of their molecules. The crucial advantage of this method is that the sample remains almost unaffected.
    Read article
  • Webinar: State of the Art Critical Point Drying

    Specimens which can be damaged due to surface tension when changing from the liquid to gaseous state need special treatment during sample preparation. Critical point drying is an efficient method for drying such delicate samples for SEM applications because it preserves the surface structure ...
    Read article
  • Mosaic Images

    Confocal laser scanning microscopes are widely used to create highly resolved 3D images of cells, subcellular structures and even single molecules. Still, an increasing number of scientists are extending their focus of bio-research from single cell studies to entire organs and organisms, analyzing the complex interactions within whole animals.
    Read article