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  • Interview with Stefan Hell – For me, Pioneering is …

    Our interview partner on the topic of Pioneering is Prf. Stefan Hell, a scientific member of the Max Planck Society and director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany, where he heads the Department of Nanobiophotonics. In addition to further chairs and memberships, he is also head of the High resolution Optical Microscopy research group, a partnership department of the German Cancer Research Center (DFKZ).
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  • The First Supercontinuum Confocal that Adapts to the Sample

    Until now, biological and medical research fluorescence imaging in multi-user facilities or institutes has been limited by the type or number of dyes that could be excited. The Leica TCS SP5 X supercontinuum confocal unites the broadband capabilities of the Leica TCS SP5 AOBS® and the freedom and flexibility to select any excitation line within the continuous range of 470 to 670 nm.
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  • The Future of Forensic Training Programs

    Wayne Buttermore, Manager Regional Sales Industry at Leica Microsystems, interviewed Skip Palenik to hear his perspective on the benefits of continuing education in forensic science.
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  • Beware of "Empty" Magnification

    This article explains how to avoid the phenomen of "empty magnification" in microscopy.
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  • FusionOptics – Combines high resolution and depth of field for ideal 3D optical Images

    A study carried out jointly by Leica Microsystems and the Institute of Neuroinformatics at the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology provided the basis for an innovation in stereomicroscopy: FusionOptics™. The significant performance increase attained by FusionOptics™ is highly valuable for everyday work at the microscope.
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  • Science Serving Justice

    Wayne Buttermore, Marketing Manager for Forensic Microscopy, Leica Microsystems, had the distinct honor of interviewing Kevin Lothridge, Executive Director of the National Forensic Science Technology Center (NFSTC) to hear his perspectives on continuing education in the forensic science community.
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  • The History of Stereo Microscopy – Part III

    Until the middle of the 19th century, microscopes were hand-crafted custom instruments. At the time, it was not possible to predict the properties of a lens in advance, so lenses were shaped and tested repeatedly until they delivered the desired magnification.
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  • The History of Stereo Microscopy – Part II

    For millennia, glass was admired for its beauty and the artful objects that could be created with it. With the rise of the exact sciences, however, researchers became more demanding with regard to glass quality. Traditional glass was not suitable for microscope lenses – streaks, bubbles and inclusions containing impurities made precise observation impossible.
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  • The History of Stereo Microscopy – Part I

    The 17th century in Europe was marked by the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648). The population lived in constant fear and poverty. Marauding hordes wandered the countryside; failed harvests, plagues, pestilence and starvation were the order of the day. Most of the population had little in the way of clothing or shoes, and lived in modest huts infested by parasites and rats.
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  • FRET Sensitized Emission Wizard Confocal

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is a technique, which allows insight into the interactions between proteins or molecules in proximities beyond light microscopic resolution.
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  • Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching with the Leica TCS SP2

    Among all photobleaching experiments which have been described, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is the most popular. It employs irradiation of a fluorophore in a living sample with a short laser pulse to degrade it and thereby abolish fluorescence followed by time-resolved image recording of the sample.
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