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  • Webinar: Sample Preparation of Nanocomposites and Nanomaterials by Ultramicrotomy - a Powerful Alternative to FIB

    In this webinar the sample preparation workflow including the Ultramicrotome Leica EM UC7, its cryo-chamber Leica EM FC7 and the pre-preparation system Leica EM TXP will be given. The main part of this webinar will cover tips and tricks to reveal the internal structure of composites and materials being investigated with TEM and STEM. Differences between Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Ultramicrotomed samples will be shown and explained.
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  • HyVolution – Super-Resolution Imaging with a Confocal Microscope

    Since the invention of the microscope, there has been continual discussion about the possibility of showing more detailed features of specimens as compared to just magnifying them. In this article we describe the HyVolution concept and how the combination of confocal multiparameter fluorescence imaging at the confocal super-resolution regime with psf-based real deconvolution allows high-speed multicolor imaging with a resolution down to 140 nm.
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  • How to do a Proper Cell Culture Quick Check

    In order to successfully work with mammalian cell lines, they must be grown under controlled conditions and require their own specific growth medium. In addition, to guarantee consistency their growth must be monitored at regular intervals. This article describes a typical workflow for subculturing an adherent cell line with detailed illustrations of all of the necessary steps.
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  • HyVolution – the Smart Path to Confocal Super-Resolution

    Super-resolution refers to any device or method that can resolve better than the classical Abbe limit. Apart from infinite super-resolution techniques such as STED (stimulated emission depletion) and SMLM (single-molecule localization methods) that can theoretically resolve to any detail, there are also methods for limited super-resolution. Here we present HyVolution by Leica, which merges optical super-resolution and computational super-resolution. The optical part is provided by confocal microscopy, and the computational part by deconvolution. Lateral resolution of 140 nm is demonstrated. HyVolution offers multiple fluorescence recording in truly simultaneous mode.
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  • Infinity Optical Systems

    “Infinity Optics” refers to the concept of a beam path with parallel rays between the objective and the tube lens of a microscope. Flat optical components can be brought into this “Infinity Space” without influencing image formation, which is critical for the utilization of contrast methods such as DIC or fluorescence. Modern microscopy techniques require the addition of multiple optical instruments, such as light sources or laser devices, into the infinite light path. Different approaches to fulfill this need have emerged and are described here.
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  • Triple-beam Ar-Ion-Milling with a Rotary Stage to Decorate Grain Boundaries and Substructures in Rock Salt

    Decoration of grain boundaries in polycrystalline rocks has a long tradition in Structural Geology as in a monomineralic rock the recrystallized grain size is a good indicator for the paleostress conditions. Understanding the mechanical properties of rock salt and its deformation behavior is of major importance for the prediction of long-term stability of nuclear waste repositories, and our understanding of the dynamics of salt-related sedimentary basins which host the majority of oil and gas accumulations on Earth.
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  • Introduction to Digital Camera Technology

    A significant majority of modern optical microscopy techniques require the use of a digital camera. By working with digital devices researchers can observe specimens on a screen in real time or acquire and store images and quantifiable data. Here we introduce the basic principles behind digital camera technologies commonly encountered in scientific imaging.
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  • FRAP with TCS SP8 Resonant Scanner

    Fast FRAP experiments need a sufficient number of measurement points for meaningful interpretation and fitting analysis. To study very fast translocational processes, the use of a resonant scanner (RS) is preferred. The advantage in using FRAP with the RS is that statistics are much better in experiments that require fast acquisition: If the half time of recovery is about 0.5 sec you may have only about 3 to 4 data points using the conventional scanner, whereas with the resonant scanner you can get about 20 data points.
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  • Mammary gland development

    Investigating the Influence of Hormone Signaling Pathways on Mammary Gland Development and the Onset of Breast Cancer

    Over their entire lifetime, 1 out of 8 women can suffer from breast cancer. The risk of developing breast cancer (mammary carcinogenesis) increases with a woman’s age and is related to her reproductive history. The chance of mammary carcinogenesis is less for women who give birth to a child before the age of 30. However, it is now known that the risk of breast cancer also can depend on the number of times a woman experiences elevated blood serum progesterone levels, in relation to the menstrual cycle, before her first pregnancy.
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  • Inspecting and Analyzing Printed Circuit Boards Quickly and Reliably with a Digital Microscope

    For the past several years, digital microscopy has been shown to be useful for inspection, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), and failure analysis (FA) in the microelectronics industry, especially for printed circuit boards (PCBs). Recently, state-of-the-art improvements have made digital microscopy even more powerful and practical for inspection, leading to a more efficient workflow. Here, the advantages of certain digital microscope features, i.e., intuitive software for operation and analysis, fast and easy ways to change magnification, and encoding for reliable recall of parameters, are explained.
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  • Automotive Industry: Rapid and Precise Surface Inspection on Hard-to-Image Samples

    In the automotive industry, microscopists may be challenged with samples that are difficult to image, for example, parts that have a special material composition. This report shows how the Leica DVM6 digital microscope helps to make inspection, measurement analysis, and reporting of such challenging samples quicker and easier.
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  • High Pressure Freezing with Light Stimulation

    Sun screen lotion was carefully filled in the 100 μm incision of a 3 mm copper/gold plated flat carrier and covered with 3 mm sapphire disk. The sun screen lotion sample was then high pressure frozen with a Leica EM ICE with and subsequently without light stimulation. The light stimulated samples were exposed to a UV light for 500 milliseconds.
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  • Workflows & Protocols: Connecting Microscopy and Molecular Biology in Neuroscience

    The main topic during this course was how to apply laser microdissection in neuroscience. Leica specialists demonstrated why laser microdissection is a suitable techniques for brain investigation as it allows to separate distinct brain layers or even to isolate individual neurons.
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  • Workflows & Protocols: How to Isolate Individual Chromosomes with Laser Microdissection

    During the first Leica Workshop in Brazil, at the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura/USP (CENA), the participants learned how to prepare samples for laser microdissection (LMD) using a cryotome. Another topic was the dissection of individual chromosomes from chromosome spreads. Leica specialists held a short training session with the LMD. After this, new LMD users were able to run the system and practiced how to dissect chromosomes and collect single chromosomes for downstream analysis.
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  • OCT Publication List

    OCT is a non-invasive, contact-free technique that helps to detect and monitor morphological changes of ocular tissue, in particular retinal layer thickness, which can give insight into pathological conditions such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or diabetic retinopathy. This references list presents selected publications performed with an Envisu OCT imaging system.
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  • Webinar: Dissecting Protein Dynamics in Living Cells by FRAP

    This webinar presented by Dr Marco Fritzsche, University of Oxford, and Jennifer Horner, PhD, Leica Microsystems, you will learn about how to use Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching (FRAP) microscopy to study protein dynamics.
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  • Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation: “The Future is Cold, Dynamic and Hybrid”

    In 2014, the renowned Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT) research lab at the University Antwerp, Belgium, and Leica Microsystems started a fruitful collaboration to establish a Leica Reference Site in Antwerp. This site, officially opened in July 2014, is dedicated to specimen preparation for electron microscopy in materials science with a special focus on ion beam milling and recently also on carbon coating. In this interview Prof Gustaf van Tendeloo, Director of EMAT, and Frédéric Leroux, TEM specimen preparation specialist, talk about research topics at EMAT, how the Leica reference site has evolved, and future trends for EM sample preparation.
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  • Illumination (Lighting) Systems for Stereo Microscopes

    This report gives users of stereo microscopes helpful advice when attempting to select optimal illumination or lighting systems for sample observation. The illumination used for microscopic observation has a very important effect on the final image quality. Choosing the illumination to achieve the best results depends upon the type of sample and its features of interest, as well as the application and purpose for microscopic observation. The following information should help microscope users to choose illumination systems that produce the best imaging results.
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  • Light Sheet Microscopy Turned Vertically

    Living cells and organisms often suffer from the high light intensities used for fluorescent imaging. Light sheet microscopy reduces phototoxic effects and bleaching by illuminating a specimen in only a single plane at a time. A new light sheet microscope combines light sheet and confocal microscopy in one system without compromising either functionality and allows the combination of the two methods, e.g. confocal photomanipulation with subsequent light sheet acquisition, for new applications.
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  • "The Leica Digital Light Sheet Module – a Clever Example of Thinking Out of the Box"

    Bram van den Broek is a postdoctoral fellow at the Netherlands cancer institute in Amsterdam where he supports the advanced microscopy techniques in the laboratory of Kees Jalink. Working with Leica Microsystems as a collaboration partner for beta-testing of microscopes he enjoys very much.
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  • Webinar: Leica Microsystems Laser Microdissection – Dissection Perfection

    Laser Microdissection (LMD) is a microscopic technique for isolating homogeneous, specific and pure targets from heterogeneous samples for downstream analysis (DNA, RNA & proteins). In this webinar you will learn about techniques for precise, contamination-free isolation of specific cell types and obtain an overview of the scientific and practical considerations for obtaining highly pure material for further molecular analysis in the field of Parkinson's disease and plant research.
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  • Webinar: Leveraging Digital Microscopy to Increase Overall Throughput and Efficiency

    The Digital Microscope has rapidly evolved from an emerging technology to the industry standard for quality-control, failure analysis and R&D inspection / measurement in various disciplines, such as Medical Devices, Plastics, Automotive, Aerospace, and Electronics manufacturing. As more companies in these markets demand increased product quality and faster time-to-result, while investing less time and money in advanced microscopy training, the Digital Microscope helps achieve these goals.
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