Contact & Support
Header Image

Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NanoBiophotonics, Göttingen, Germany

http://nanobiophotonics.mpibpc.mpg.de

http://www.mpibpc.mpg.de/english/research/dep/hell/

  • Abstracts of the 6th European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 6th European Super-Resolution User Club Meeting was held in collaboration with Dr. Timo Zimmermann, CRG, and Dr. Pablo Loza-Alvarez, ICFO, Barcelona. According to the founding principle of the club of keeping close to science, both imaging facilities at the CRG and the ICFO opened their doors to the User Club members, allowing them to explore exciting super-resolution and and nanoscopy applications. The meeting agenda covered highly relevant talks around this year’s central theme “Core Facilities and Super-Resolution Microscopy”, as well as plenty of opportunities to network amongst super-resolution users from different European countries. Here we present the abstracts of the talks held during the meeting.
    Read article
  • 4Pi-RESOLFT Nanoscopy

    Here we apply the 4Pi scheme to RESOLFT nanoscopy using two-photon absorption for the on-switching of fluorescent proteins. We show that in this combination, the lobes are so low that low-light level, 3D nanoscale imaging of living cells becomes possible. Our method thus offers robust access to densely packed, axially extended cellular regions that have been notoriously difficult to super-resolve. Our approach also entails a fluorescence read-out scheme that translates molecular sensitivity to local off-switching rates into improved signal-to-noise ratio and resolution.
    Read article
  • Video: Fluorescence is a State of Mind

    How to break a fundamental law of physics and win a Nobel Prize to boot. Stefan Hell explains super-resolved fluorescence microscopy for which he shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in chemistry.
    Read article
  • A Straightforward Approach for Gated STED-FCS to Investigate Lipid Membrane Dynamics

    Recent years have seen the development of multiple technologies to investigate, with great spatial and temporal resolution, the dynamics of lipids in cellular and model membranes. One of these approaches is the combination of far-field super-resolution stimulated-emission-depletion (STED) microscopy with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy ( FCS ). STED- FCS combines the diffraction-unlimited spatial resolution of STED microscopy with the statistical accuracy of FCS to determine sub-millisecond-fast molecular dynamics with single-molecule sensitivity.
    Read article
  • Cortical Actin Networks Induce Spatio-temporal Confinement of Phospholipids in the Plasma Membrane – A Minimally Invasive Investigation by STED-FCS

    Important discoveries in the last decades have changed our view of the plasma membrane organisation. Specifically, the cortical cytoskeleton has emerged as a key modulator of the lateral diffusion of membrane proteins. Cytoskeleton-dependent compartmentalised lipid diffusion has been proposed, but this concept remains controversial because this phenomenon has thus far only been observed with artefact-prone probes in combination with a single technique: single particle tracking.
    Read article
  • CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Endogenous Protein Tagging for RESOLFT Super-Resolution Microscopy of Living Human Cells

    Overexpression is a notorious concern in conventional and especially in super-resolution fluorescence light microscopy studies because it may cause numerous artifacts including ectopic sub-cellular localizations, erroneous formation of protein complexes, and others. Nonetheless, current live cell super-resolution microscopy studies generally rely on the overexpression of a host protein fused to a fluorescent protein.
    Read article
  • A Lipid Bound Actin Meshwork Organizes Liquid Phase Separation in Model Membranes

    The eukaryotic cell membrane is connected to a dense actin rich cortex. We present FCS and STED experiments showing that dense membrane bound actin networks have severe influence on lipid phase separation. Our results reveal a mechanism how cells may prevent macroscopic demixing of their membrane components, while at the same time regulate the local membrane composition.
    Read article
  • Four questions for Professor Stefan Hell on the subject of FOM 2015

    For Professor Stefan Hell, who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2014 for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy and the development of STED microscopy, the Focus on Microscopy conference has a very special significance. It was at the very first FOM 1998 in Sydney where Hell gave one of his first lectures on super-resolution, entitled "Super-resolution through 4Pi-confocal microscopy in cellular imaging".
    Read article
  • Video Interview with Stefan Hell, the Inventor of Super-Resolution

    Professor Stefan Hell is director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry and head of the department of NanoBiophotonics in Goettingen and widely considered as the father of super-resolution. His inventions of 4Pi and STED microscopy were turned into the first commercial super-resolution microscopes available by Leica Microsystems in 2004 and 2007.
    Read article
  • STED Microscopy of Living Cells – New Frontiers in Membrane and Neurobiology

    Recent developments in fluorescence far-field microscopy such as STED microscopy have accomplished observation of the living cell with a spatial resolution far below the diffraction limit. Here, we briefly review the current approaches to super-resolution optical microscopy and present the implementation of STED microscopy for novel insights into live cell mechanisms, with a focus on neurobiology and plasma membrane dynamics.
    Read article
  • Video Talk on Super-Resolution: Overview and Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) Microscopy

    Historically, light microscopy has been limited in its ability to resolve closely spaced objects, with the best microscopes only able to resolve objects separated by 200 nm or more. This limit is known as the diffraction limit. In the last twenty years, a number of techniques have been developed that allow resolution beyond the diffraction limit.
    Read article
  • Abstracts of the 3rd European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 3rd meeting of the Leica Super-Resolution User Club was held from June 17th to 19th, 2013 in collaboration with Alberto Diaspro and the Italian Institute of Technology (IIT) in Genoa. Confocal and widefield super-resolution users from ten European countries took three days’ out to deepen their knowledge on super-resolution techniques and applications and make use of an opportunity for full exchange of experiences.
    Read article
  • Abstracts of the 2nd European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The 2nd meeting of the Leica Super-resolution User club was held from September 25 to 27, 2012 in collaboration with the Science for Life Laboratory at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. With a mixture of engaging talks by key experts in the field of super-resolution microscopy and stimulating discussion sessions, the meeting proved as popular as last year’s event, attracting a wide range of scientists interested in both confocal and widefield super-resolution and sample preparation techniques.
    Read article
  • Sharp Live Images from the Mouse Brain

    To explore the most intricate structures of the brain in order to decipher how it functions – Stefan Hell’s team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen has made a significant step closer to this goal. Using the STED microscopy developed by Hell, the scientists have, for the first time, managed to record detailed live images inside the brain of a living mouse.
    Read article
  • Abstracts of the First European Super-Resolution User-Club Meeting

    The first European Super-resolution User-Club meeting took place from October 27 to 29 in Göttingen, Germany. Prof. Stefan Hell, the inventor of the STED technology, has hosted this first meeting. The user club is aimed at pioneering researchers from the European scientific community, who are early adopters and developers of super-resolution techniques.
    Read article
  • Webinar: Super-Resolution

    In 1873, Ernst Abbe developed a theory that defined the limit of resolution of the light microscope. Following suit from astronomy, Abbe defined resolution as the ability to resolve, as separate, two point sources of light. The Abbe limit of 200–300 nm is based upon the ability of the light microscope to collect only a subset of spatial frequencies and the physiological properties of the human eye.
    Read article
  • STED Nanoscopy of Actin Dynamics in Synapses deep inside Living Brain Slices

    It is difficult to investigate the mechanisms that mediate long-term changes in synapse function because synapses are small and deeply embedded inside brain tissue. Although recent fluorescence nanoscopy techniques afford improved resolution, they have so far been restricted to dissociated cells or tissue surfaces. However, to study synapses under realistic conditions, one must image several cell layers deep inside more-intact, three-dimensional preparations that exhibit strong light scattering, such as brain slices or brains in vivo.
    Read article
  • Nanoscopy in a Living Multicellular Organism Expressing GFP

    We report superresolution fluorescence microscopy in an intact living organism, namely Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins. We also superresolve, by stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, living cultured cells, demonstrating that STED microscopy with GFP can be widely applied.
    Read article