Leica Science Lab - Tag : Cameras https://www.leica-microsystems.com//science-lab/tag/?tx_leicaacademy_pi4%5Baction%5D=show&tx_leicaacademy_pi4%5Bcontroller%5D=Tag&tx_leicaacademy_pi4%5Btag%5D=9&cHash=aedc5858665568bd036fb412615a10d6 Article tagged with Cameras en-US https://www.leica-microsystems.com/15127 Basics in Microscopy Digital Microscopy Stereo Microscopy What Does 30,000:1 Magnification Really Mean? One important criterion concerning the performance of an optical microscope is magnification. This report will offer digital microscopy users helpful guidelines to determine the useful range of magnification values. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/what-does-300001-magnification-really-mean/ Mon, 25 Jun 2018 22:00:00 +0000 MSc Michael Doppler, PhD James DeRose https://www.leica-microsystems.com/19548 Widefield Microscopy Basics in Microscopy Introduction to Widefield Microscopy One of the most basic microscopy techniques is known as ‘Widefield Microscopy’. It is fundamentally any technique in which the entire specimen of interest is exposed to the light source with the resulting image being viewed either by the observer or a camera (which can also be attached to a computer monitor). https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/introduction-to-widefield-microscopy/ Thu, 29 Jun 2017 11:31:00 +0000 PhD Martin Wilson https://www.leica-microsystems.com/18806 Super-Resolution Practical Guide for Excellent GSDIM Super-Resolution Images Do you know that most protists and bacteria lack in one feature that each of our body cell has? Our cells are touch and communicate with one another. They send and receive a variety of signals that coordinate their behavior to act together as a functional multicellular organism. Exploring the way of cellular communication and the ways how the cell surface interacts to organize tissues and body structures is of great interest. Kees Jalink and his team of scientists at the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) in Amsterdam obtained new scientific insights into the molecular architecture of hemidesmosomes, cytoskeletal components, cell surface receptors and vesicular proteins with the help of Ground-State-Depletion (GSD)/ dSTORM microscopy. In this interview, Kees Jalink comments on their developments in imaging chambers, buffer conditions and image analysis to get the perfect super resolution image. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/practical-guide-for-excellent-gsdim-super-resolution-images/ Wed, 26 Oct 2016 06:58:00 +0000 PhD Kees Jalink, PhD Tamara Straube, MSc Leila Nahidiazar, MSc Daniela Leyton Puig https://www.leica-microsystems.com/17472 Basics in Microscopy Widefield Microscopy Definitions of Basic Technical Terms for Digital Microscope Cameras and Image Analysis Most microscopes today are operated with a camera. The characteristics of the camera often decide whether the acquired image will reveal what a researcher wants to see. But when diving into camera terminology, the technical terms can be overwhelming. We have compiled the most important terms with a concise explanation to provide orientation. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/definitions-of-basic-technical-terms-for-digital-microscope-cameras-and-image-analysis/ Tue, 19 Apr 2016 11:39:00 +0000 Claudia Müller, Dr. Christoph Greb, Dr. Karin Schwab https://www.leica-microsystems.com/17931 Live-Cell Imaging What Makes sCMOS Microscope Cameras so Popular? sCMOS cameras are more sensitive and are capable of much higher acquisition speed than cameras with other sensor types. Even though CCD cameras are widely used in live cell imaging and time-lapse recordings, researchers are often concerned that their camera does not detect faint signals. In this interview, Dr. Karin Schwab, Product Manager at Leica Microsystems, talks about the characteristics of sCMOS cameras and how researchers benefit from the latest camera sensor technology. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/what-makes-scmos-microscope-cameras-so-popular/ Mon, 11 Apr 2016 10:22:00 +0000 Claudia Müller, Dr. Karin Schwab https://www.leica-microsystems.com/17468 Basics in Microscopy Widefield Microscopy Introduction to Digital Camera Technology A significant majority of modern optical microscopy techniques require the use of a digital camera. By working with digital devices researchers can observe specimens on a screen in real time or acquire and store images and quantifiable data. Here we introduce the basic principles behind digital camera technologies commonly encountered in scientific imaging. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/introduction-to-digital-camera-technology/ Tue, 02 Feb 2016 16:40:00 +0000 Dr. Christoph Greb, Dr. Peter Laskey, Dr. Karin Schwab https://www.leica-microsystems.com/15057 Super-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging Towards Digital Photon Counting Cameras for Single-molecule Optical Nanoscopy A SPAD array camera with single-photon sensitivity and zero read-out noise allows for the detection of extremely weak signals at ultra-fast imaging speeds. With temporal resolution in the order of micro-seconds, a SPAD array camera offers great potential for live-cell imaging with super-resolution. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/towards-digital-photon-counting-cameras-for-single-molecule-optical-nanoscopy/ Wed, 04 Mar 2015 08:06:00 +0000 https://www.leica-microsystems.com/6499 Fluorescence Microscopy Live-Cell Imaging Widefield Microscopy Digital Camera Technologies for Scientific Bio-Imaging This four-part series of articles published in Microscopy and Analysis covers the factors to consider in choosing a camera among CCD, EMCCD, and scientific-grade CMOS camera technologies for biological imaging applications. The differences among the sensor architectures and the impact of parameters such as pixel size, noise, and QE on signal-to-noise performance, image quality, and Nyquist sampling are considered. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/digital-camera-technologies-for-scientific-bio-imaging/ Wed, 18 Jul 2012 22:00:00 +0000 https://www.leica-microsystems.com/2558 Stereo Microscopy Basics in Microscopy Widefield Microscopy Digital Cameras Manufacturers digital cameras race to outdo each other with ever-increasing numbers of megapixels. The world record for professional medium format digital cameras has now surpassed 60 megapixels per shot using a very large and expensive sensor with a resolution of about 9000 x 6700 pixels. Each time you capture such an image you get about 180 MB of uncompressed data and even more if you switch to 16-bit per colour for full dynamic range. https://www.leica-microsystems.com/science-lab/digital-cameras/ Thu, 30 Apr 2009 22:00:00 +0000 Urs Schmid