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Digital Microscope

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  • Free Webinar On-Demand: Digital Microscopy in Earth Science

    Classical polarized light (compound) microscopes can only be used for prepared samples, because the working distance they offer is insufficient for whole samples. This means that thicker and bigger geological samples have to be sectioned and polished to fit under the limited working distance of a compound microscope. The Leica DVM 6 provides outstanding image quality, extra working distance and allows geologists to work with polished and unpolished samples (micro mounts, fossils, drilled cores …), make 3D reconstructions of their surfaces and enables classical petrographic work as well.
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  • Forensics: How to Gather Evidence from Hair, Fibers, Paint, Explosives, and Insects Fast and Easily with Digital Microscopy

    Digital microscopes have no eyepieces and the image is observed directly on a monitor. They are very popular for a variety of applications in multiple fields. State-of-the-art digital microscopes, such as the Leica DVM6, allow an efficient workflow for forensic analysis. Examples of how forensic scientists can gather evidence from hair, fibers, paint layers, explosive residues/small particles, and insects efficiently using the Leica DVM6 digital microscope are described in this report.
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  • How Digital Microscopy can Contribute to Efficient Workflows for Microelectronics and Electronics

    This report explains how users can benefit from the digital microscope portfolio of Leica Microsystems to attain cost-effectiveness over entire workflows in research and development (R&D), product innovation, process engineering, production, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), and failure analysis (FA).
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  • Forensics: How to Gather Evidence from Ballistics, Tool Marks, Questioned Documents, Counterfeiting, and Forgery Fast and Easily with Digital Microscopy

    The examples reported here demonstrate how digital microscopy enables forensic scientists to gather and compare evidence from ballistics and tool marks or counterfeited money, credit cards, and documents, more efficiently. Images and videos clearly show how to use the digital microscope to perform forensics investigations and how you speed up your workflow with the help of practical features, such as a convenient way to change magnification rapidly over the full range, tilting, sample rotation, and versatile illumination.
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  • How to Analyze Prepared and Unprepared Geological Samples with One Digital Microscope

    Polarized light microscopes have been used in classical earth science studies for the last 100 years. Since then a lot of progress has been made to increase the user friendliness, ergonomy, and optical performance of such microscopes. Still, one thing has not changed: Classical polarized light (compound) microscopes can only be used for prepared samples, because the working distance they offer is insufficient for whole samples. This article explains how earth scientists can analyze prepared and unprepared samples for polarized light applications with one single instrument, namely the Leica DVM6 M digital microscope. With the right choice of accessories it serves as a semi-quantitative polarization microscope.
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  • Inspecting and Analyzing Printed Circuit Boards Quickly and Reliably with a Digital Microscope

    For the past several years, digital microscopy has been shown to be useful for inspection, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), and failure analysis (FA) in the microelectronics industry, especially for printed circuit boards (PCBs). Recently, state-of-the-art improvements have made digital microscopy even more powerful and practical for inspection, leading to a more efficient workflow. Here, the advantages of certain digital microscope features, i.e., intuitive software for operation and analysis, fast and easy ways to change magnification, and encoding for reliable recall of parameters, are explained.
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  • Webinar: Leveraging Digital Microscopy to Increase Overall Throughput and Efficiency

    The Digital Microscope has rapidly evolved from an emerging technology to the industry standard for quality-control, failure analysis and R&D inspection / measurement in various disciplines, such as Medical Devices, Plastics, Automotive, Aerospace, and Electronics manufacturing. As more companies in these markets demand increased product quality and faster time-to-result, while investing less time and money in advanced microscopy training, the Digital Microscope helps achieve these goals.
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  • What You Always Wanted to Know About Digital Microscopy, but Never Got Around to Asking

    Digital microscopy is one of the buzz words in microscopy – and there are a couple of facts that are useful to know. Georg Schlaffer, Product Manager with Leica Microsystems, has often been asked about digital microscopy by customers and colleagues alike. He has worked together with Scientific Writer Jim DeRose for comprehensive answers to the most important ones.
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  • What Does 30,000:1 Magnification Really Mean?

    One important criterion concerning the performance of an optical microscope is magnification. This report will offer digital microscopy users helpful guidelines to determine the useful range of magnification values.
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  • Are Your Digital Microscope Measurements Accurate and Reliable?

    For certain applications, such as the production and maintenance of automobiles, aircraft, or power plants, quality control and reliability assurance, as well as safety and health inspection, accurate and reliable image data with precise calibration are very important. Digital microscopes are appealing for a wide range of technical applications in various industries, such as automotive, aerospace, precision engineering, microelectronics, and medical devices.
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  • Tips & Tricks for Using Digital Microscopes

    Digital microscopes provide new opportunities and enhance workflow for measurement and documentation in quality control in 2D and 3D applications. Here, you can find a collection of videos showing set-up tips and tricks for optimal image acquisition. Learn about the use of the zoom lens, the BGA lens, the 360° rotary head, the inclinable stand and the installation of a camera.
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  • Digital Microscopy

    Digital microscopy offers clear advantages for a large number of industrial quality inspections, particularly for surface analysis. Here, you can find some videos that show examples of application for digital microscopy.
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  • 3D Visualization of Surface Structures

    One of the main features of a digital microscope is the speed and ease with which it enables surface models to be created of macroscopic and microscopic structures. In a qualitative evaluation, these provide a better understanding and a more detailed documentation of the specimen. In addition, quantification of the surface provides valuable information about the composition of the surface and its wear. Which specimens are suitable for use with a Leica digital microscope, and what are the limitations of the method used?
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  • Trends in Microscopy

    There are digital cameras, digital TV sets, digital picture frames, digital schools on the internet. Cryptologists design digital signatures, communication researchers speak of digital identity. Digital may be an overused buzzword, but digital technology has undeniably revolutionized our world ever since the invention of the computer and will continue to do so in future.
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  • Collecting "Funny Money"

    Nobody wants counterfeit money in their wallet. Even counterfeiters want to get rid of their own creations as quickly as possible. However, experts work intensively to identify counterfeit money on behalf of the law. Martin Weber of the National Analysis Center of the German Bundesbank (Federal Bank) in Mainz is such an expert on forged banknotes.
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  • Ancient Feast of Color

    Everyone knows that antique marble sculptures were white. Or were they? Scientists of the Copenhagen Polychromy Network (CPN) help to show that the statues of the Greeks and Romans were decorated with extravagant ornaments and sumptuous colours. With the help of a surgical microscope and digital microscopy, the conservators detect tiny traces of paint pigment that suggest a veritable feast of colour in ancient times.
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