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  • Actin-Dependent Vacuolar Occupancy of the Cell Determines Auxin-Induced Growth Repression

    The cytoskeleton is an early attribute of cellular life, and its main components are composed of conserved proteins. The actin cytoskeleton has a direct impact on the control of cell size in animal cells, but its mechanistic contribution to cellular growth in plants remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a role of actin in regulating cell size in plants. The actin cytoskeleton shows proximity to vacuoles, and the phytohormone auxin not only controls the organization of actin filaments but also impacts vacuolar morphogenesis in an actin-dependent manner.
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  • P53- and Mevalonate Pathway–Driven Malignancies Require Arf6 for Metastasis and Drug Resistance

    Application example of HvYolution Super-Resolution - Drug resistance, metastasis, and a mesenchymal transcriptional program are central features of aggressive breast tumors. The GTPase Arf6, often overexpressed in tumors, is critical to promote epithelial–mesenchymal transition and invasiveness. The metabolic mevalonate pathway (MVP) is associated with tumor invasiveness and known to prenylate proteins, but which prenylated proteins are critical for MVP-driven cancers is unknown. We show here that MVP requires the Arf6-dependent mesenchymal program.
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  • From Light to Mind: Sensors and Measuring Techniques in Confocal Microscopy

    This article outlines the most important sensors used in confocal microscopy. By confocal microscopy, we mean "True Confocal Scanning", i.e. the technique that illuminates and measures one single point only. The aim is not to impart in-depth specialist knowledge, but to give the user a small but clear overview of the differences between the various technologies and to advise on which sensor may be most suitable for which applications.
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  • "Leica is always flexible and dynamic" - Interview with Audrey Salles, Pasteur Institute, Paris

    Audrey Salles is a specialist for confocal and super-resolution microscopy at Pasteur Institute, Imagopole, PFID, Paris, France. Her research interests are cytokine signaling and skeleton organization of human TCD4-cells.
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  • Multiple Microscopy Modes in a Single Sweep with Supercontinuum White Light

    Lasers have been critical to the advancement on confocal microscopy, and the white light laser (WLL) offers particular advantages. Finessing WLL output for bioimaging is a complex task, though, and traditional approaches retain key limitations. But acousto-optical beamsplitting enables smoother operation, leading to enhanced microscopy capabilities.
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  • The White Confocal – Spectral Gaps Closed

    This article summarizes the development and differences in design and functionality of confocal technology as far as spectral properties are concerned, from classical filter-based excitation and emission color selection to fully flexible spectral excitation and emission tuning. All three major components: light source with excitation color selection, beam splitting for incident illumination and detector emission filtering have been completely transformed.
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  • Detectors for Sensitive Detection: HyD

    This article discusses detectors (more precisely: sensors), that are employed in single point, i.e. true confocal scanning microscopes. The sensors in such systems are usually photomultiplier tubes. Also, the silicon pendants of PMTs are used for particular applications, especially single-molecule measurements. A new development has led to chimeric devices called hybrid detector (HyD) which unite benefits of both technologies.
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  • Gates Open for Improved Confocal Fluorescence and Super-Resolution STED

    True confocal microscope systems feature single-point illumination and single-point detection. The method is called "optical sectioning" since the generated image contains only information from the focal plane. The serial detection offers highly efficient and low-noise sensors for signal conversion. Although the nonparallel detection is not conducive to high-speed imaging, modern scanning concepts allow frame rates above 400 frames per second at reasonable noise levels. This is by far enough for most applications, including the monitoring of fast ion-transport phenomena in living material.
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  • Sensors for True Confocal Scanning

    In this article, advantages and disadvantages of different types of sensors for single point true confocal scanning devices are discussed. Traditionally, photomultiplier tubes have been employed in such systems. For some cases, avalanche photodiodes have proven to fit best. A new development uniting vacuum and silicon technology has led to chimeric sensors, called hybrid detectors (HyD). They benefit from both technologies.
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  • Step by Step Guide to Hybrid Detection and Photon Counting

    This tutorial explains the underlying hybrid detection technology and compares it to photomultiplier technology. The implications of hybrid detection design for imaging and photon counting are discussed. The tutorial closes with a brief summary of photon counting in the context of imaging.
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