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  • Milestones in Incident Light Fluorescence Microscopy

    Since the middle of the last century, fluorescence microscopy developed into a bio scientific tool with one of the biggest impacts on our understanding of life. Watching cells and proteins with the help of fluorescence molecules is a standard method in nearly every life science discipline today. This broad application range goes back to the technical work of some researchers who wanted to improve and simplify fluorescence microscopic labor. One person who was involved in that development was the Dutch medic Johann Sebastiaan Ploem.
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  • Digital Microscopy with Versatile Illumination and Various Contrast Methods for More Efficient Inspection and Quality Control

    State-of-the-art digital microscopes utilizing a versatile illumination system capable of achieving multiple contrast methods, such as the Leica DVM6, are very useful for inspection, quality control, and failure analysis. These contrast methods allow flaws or defects on the surface of a product or component to be more easily and rapidly detected.
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  • Successful Endodontic Treatment Supported by a Dental Microscope

    In endodontics, accurate treatment is not only dependent on the technical skills and knowledge of the dentist, but also on clear, detailed visualization of the surgical field. As the outcome of an endodontic therapy is influenced by many factors that are not visible to the naked eye – e.g. additional root canals or anatomical variations – the high magnification and illumination provided by a dental microscope has become indispensable for both diagnosis and therapy. Today, it is widely agreed that the use of dental microscopes has helped to extend endodontic treatment potential.
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  • How to Analyze Prepared and Unprepared Geological Samples with One Digital Microscope

    Polarized light microscopes have been used in classical earth science studies for the last 100 years. Since then a lot of progress has been made to increase the user friendliness, ergonomy, and optical performance of such microscopes. Still, one thing has not changed: Classical polarized light (compound) microscopes can only be used for prepared samples, because the working distance they offer is insufficient for whole samples. This article explains how earth scientists can analyze prepared and unprepared samples for polarized light applications with one single instrument, namely the Leica DVM6 M digital microscope. With the right choice of accessories it serves as a semi-quantitative polarization microscope.
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  • "The excellent red reflex, combined with the IOL guidance system, makes it possible for me to work quickly and precisely during refractive procedures."

    Excellent red reflex as well as maximum accuracy throughout the entire procedure are required to meet these expectations. Dr. Ulrich Jung, Medical Director at the ARTEMIS eye clinic in Dillenburg, Germany, tested the Proveo 8 ophthalmological microscope from Leica Microsystems in combination with the positioning system IOLcompass Pro for intraocular lenses at his clinic. In this interview, Dr. Jung reports his experiences.
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  • The Dental Microscope in Endodontics

    In dentistry a bright, magnified view into deep cavities supports detailed diagnosis and precise therapy, particularly in the field of endodontics. In this interview Dr. Dean Raicov explains the benefits of the dental microscope in his practice. Dr. Raicov is a dentist based in Röhrnbach, Germany and specializes in endodontics, parodontology, and prosthetics. He is a member of the European Society of Microscope Dentistry (ESMD) and the German Society of Endodontics and Paradontology.
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  • Cataract and Glaucoma Surgery with the Proveo 8 Ophthalmic Microscope

    These videos recorded during cataract and glaucoma surgery using Proveo 8 demonstrate how Dr. Ahmed benefits from continuous red reflex even during phaco, due to exclusive CoAx 4 coaxial illumination, and high resolution combined with depth of focus for a texture-rich view due to FusionOptics technology.
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  • Six Features to Consider when Choosing a Dental Microscope

    In dental medicine, the surgical microscope has become increasingly important for high-quality and successful surgeries, particularly in the field of endodontics. A microscope supports the dentist to conduct micro-invasive surgeries which aim to preserve the tooth substance, conserve the tissue, minimize the risks and reduce healing time. To choose the microscope that best fits the dentist’s needs, it is helpful to know some of the decisive features of a modern dental microscope.
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  • How a State-of-the-Art Microscope Helps to Optimize the Workflow in Cataract Surgery

    Typical ophthalmic procedures require specific levels of light, focus and magnification in each phase of surgery. Changing quickly between these settings is the prerequisite for an uninterrupted and smooth workflow where the surgeon can concentrate completely on his patient. The surgical microscope for ophthalmology Proveo 8 features a unique level of customization that allows to program complete surgical phases and single parameters. Dr. Devesh Varma is one of the first ophthalmologists having tested the Proveo 8 microscope.
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  • The Impact of a Stable Red Reflex and Enhanced Focus in Cataract Surgery

    In cataract surgery, ophthalmologists rely on the red reflex which provides ideal contrast to visualize the capsule, lens and anterior chamber structure. A new illumination technology in the latest of ophthalmic microscopes now appears to provide great breadth of red reflex enhancement throughout the entire procedure. Dr. Ike Ahmed is one of the first ophthalmologists having tested the Proveo 8 microscope which features the CoAx4 illumination.
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  • Cataract Surgery with CoAx4 Illumination

    A stable red reflex is one of the most important features of an ophthalmic surgical microscope for cataract surgery. It’s the red reflex that makes the structure of the lens visible and thus makes for a uncompromised view for a successful and secure surgery. However, conventional red reflex illumination often decreases during the critical phases of the procedure like phacoemulsification. A new illumination technology with four individual beam paths overcomes these drawbacks.
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  • Automotive Industry: Rapid and Precise Surface Inspection on Hard-to-Image Samples

    In the automotive industry, microscopists may be challenged with samples that are difficult to image, for example, parts that have a special material composition. This report shows how the Leica DVM6 digital microscope helps to make inspection, measurement analysis, and reporting of such challenging samples quicker and easier.
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  • Color Infidelity: Why Using a Light Source Incorrectly is Cheating on your Data

    There are many influences on color in the imaging process including lighting, optics, sensor, and monitor, and ultimately print. The first, and generally most important, is lighting. There are plenty of options for light sources, Halogen, LED, and arc lamps are among the most popular for microscopes. Each light source has its own advantages and disadvantages and it is up to the user to learn which is best for the sample and application.
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  • Illumination (Lighting) Systems for Stereo Microscopes

    This report gives users of stereo microscopes helpful advice when attempting to select optimal illumination or lighting systems for sample observation. The illumination used for microscopic observation has a very important effect on the final image quality. Choosing the illumination to achieve the best results depends upon the type of sample and its features of interest, as well as the application and purpose for microscopic observation. The following information should help microscope users to choose illumination systems that produce the best imaging results.
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  • Webinar: Leveraging Digital Microscopy to Increase Overall Throughput and Efficiency

    The Digital Microscope has rapidly evolved from an emerging technology to the industry standard for quality-control, failure analysis and R&D inspection / measurement in various disciplines, such as Medical Devices, Plastics, Automotive, Aerospace, and Electronics manufacturing. As more companies in these markets demand increased product quality and faster time-to-result, while investing less time and money in advanced microscopy training, the Digital Microscope helps achieve these goals.
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  • Metallography – an Introduction

    Metallography is the study of the microstructure of all types of metallic alloys. It can be more precisely defined as the scientific discipline of observing and determining the chemical and atomic structure and spatial distribution of the constituents, inclusions or phases in metallic alloys. By extension, these same principles can be applied to the characterization of any material.
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  • Stereo microscopes with TripleBeam Technology

    Especially in fluorescence microscopy, excitation light is friend and foe in one. On the one hand, energy-rich excitation via a specific light wavelength of the fluorochrome resulting in a bright positive fluorochrome signal is highly welcome. On the other hand, "noise" caused by reflections of excitation light passing through the surfaces of optical elements needs to be extremely slight to generate a perfect black background. This relation is described as "signal-to-noise ratio", which is highly relevant for differentiating optically between fluorescence positive and negative cells.
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  • The White Confocal – Spectral Gaps Closed

    This article summarizes the development and differences in design and functionality of confocal technology as far as spectral properties are concerned, from classical filter-based excitation and emission color selection to fully flexible spectral excitation and emission tuning. All three major components: light source with excitation color selection, beam splitting for incident illumination and detector emission filtering have been completely transformed.
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  • 3D Visualization of Surface Structures

    One of the main features of a digital microscope is the speed and ease with which it enables surface models to be created of macroscopic and microscopic structures. In a qualitative evaluation, these provide a better understanding and a more detailed documentation of the specimen. In addition, quantification of the surface provides valuable information about the composition of the surface and its wear. Which specimens are suitable for use with a Leica digital microscope, and what are the limitations of the method used?
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  • White Light Laser

    The perfect light source for confocal microscopes in biomedical applications has sufficient intensity, tunable color and is pulsed for use in lifetime fluorescence. Furthermore, it should offer means to avoid reflection of excitation light, and the coupling into the beam path must be efficient and homogeneous throughout the full visible spectrum. Such a source has been invented and implemented: the white light laser in combination with acousto-optical beam splitting.
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  • Factors to Consider When Selecting a Stereo Microscope

    Stereo microscopes are often nicknamed the workhorse of the lab or the production department. Users spend many hours behind the ocular inspecting, observing, documenting or dissecting samples. Which factors need to be considered when selecting...
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  • Confocal Excitation

    Fluorescence excitation needs specifically colored light. In confocal microscopy, multiline lasers or laser batteries are classically used. This requires devices that pick the requested lines fitting the currently employed fluorochromes. Intensity control is a second task that must be accomplished.
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  • Lasers for Confocal

    True confocal scanning microscopy (TCS) requires bright diffraction-limited illumination.
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  • Koehler Illumination

    This tutorial demonstrates the basic steps for setting up a correct illumination of specimen with transmitted (and reflected) light.
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  • Fluorescence in Microscopy

    Fluorescence microscopy is a special form of light microscopy. It uses the ability of fluorochromes to emit light after being excited with light of a certain wavelength. Proteins of interest can be marked with such fluorochromes via antibody staining or tagging with fluorescent proteins.
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  • Multi-Wavelength Epi-Illumination in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Fluorescence is a process where a substance after having absorbed light (photons) emitts a radiation the wavelength (colour) of which is longer than that of the absorbed light, and where this emission stops immediately after cessation of the excitation. This phenomenon is the basic element of fluorescence microscopy and its application.
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