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  • See the Structure with Microscopy - Know the Composition with Laser Spectroscopy

    The advantages of a 2-in-1 materials analysis solution combining optical microscopy and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for simultaneous visual and chemical inspection are described in this report. The basic principles of the 2-in-1 solution and a comparison between it and other common materials analysis methods, such scanning electron microscopy (SEM), are explained to demonstrate how a rapid, efficient workflow is achieved. A 2-in-1 analysis solution can reduce significantly the cost and time for obtaining material image and composition data. Such data are instrumental in assuring quality and reliability to make confident decisions quickly during production, quality control, failure analysis, and research and development in industries and fields, such as automotive and metallurgy.
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  • Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes.
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  • Free Webinar On-Demand: Rate the quality of your steel

    The quality of steel is an essential topic in automotive, metalworking and building industries. To ensure the highest standards, an accurate and reliable Quality Assurance workflow for the inspection of non-metallic inclusions is crucial.
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  • Free Webinar On-Demand: Analyze grain size on microstructures the way you need

    Grain size plays an essential role in the mechanical properties of materials. Learn how to overcome problems in sample preparation and how to analyze different materials like, steel, aluminium, titanium, copper and ceramics.
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  • "Shallow Trench Isolation" Structures - Sample Preparation for TEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - The cross-sectional preparation of structured semiconductor materials requires a very thorough mechanical pre-preparation. In doing this, it must be ensured that the structure of interest should be located as close to the centre of the sample as possible. As the sample will be ion milled from both sides, a specific preparation of the structure is necessary in most cases, which means that you must thin these structures from both sides.
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  • Cross Sectioning of Basalt Fibres

    Application Note for Leica EM TIC 3X - Material Research. Purpose: The fibres are embedded in a soft matrix. That makes it difficult to prepare a cross section. Goal: Cross section of the basalt fibres.
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  • Webinar: Sample Preparation of Nanocomposites and Nanomaterials by Ultramicrotomy - a Powerful Alternative to FIB

    In this webinar the sample preparation workflow including the Ultramicrotome Leica EM UC7, its cryo-chamber Leica EM FC7 and the pre-preparation system Leica EM TXP will be given. The main part of this webinar will cover tips and tricks to reveal the internal structure of composites and materials being investigated with TEM and STEM. Differences between Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Ultramicrotomed samples will be shown and explained.
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  • Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation: “The Future is Cold, Dynamic and Hybrid”

    In 2014, the renowned Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT) research lab at the University Antwerp, Belgium, and Leica Microsystems started a fruitful collaboration to establish a Leica Reference Site in Antwerp. This site, officially opened in July 2014, is dedicated to specimen preparation for electron microscopy in materials science with a special focus on ion beam milling and recently also on carbon coating. In this interview Prof Gustaf van Tendeloo, Director of EMAT, and Frédéric Leroux, TEM specimen preparation specialist, talk about research topics at EMAT, how the Leica reference site has evolved, and future trends for EM sample preparation.
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  • A Good Place for Materials Scientists and Mineralogists to prepare their EM Samples

    In June 2014, the Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC) of the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris became a Leica reference lab for EM Sample Preparation with equipment like the Leica EM TXP target surfacing systems and the Leica EM TIC 3X ion beam milling system. In the interview, Imène Estève, engineer at the Centre National de Recherches Scientifiques (CNRS) and head of the SEM-FIB national facility, in charge of running the lab, tells us about how this cooperation has developed.
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  • Partner Lab for EM Sample Preparation in Paris

    At the Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie (IMPMC) of the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris an new lab for EM Sample Preparation welcomes researchers of materials sciences and mineralogy: the lab has been equipped with Leica EM TXP target surfacing systems and Leica EM TIC3X ion beam systems.
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  • Metallography – an Introduction

    Metallography is the study of the microstructure of all types of metallic alloys. It can be more precisely defined as the scientific discipline of observing and determining the chemical and atomic structure and spatial distribution of the constituents, inclusions or phases in metallic alloys. By extension, these same principles can be applied to the characterization of any material.
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  • A Word on Cathodoluminescence

    Cathodoluminescence microanalysis is an emerging technique that is fast gaining popularity in the world of materials science. CL is a light emission phenomena resulting from the electron beam excitation of a luminescent material.
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  • Research for the Optimal Structure

    To see how liquids can be made to flow, without being directly heated or touched, you only have to watch a raw egg explode in a microwave oven. Electromagnetic forces can even melt metal at hotter than 1000 °C. In the Magnetohydrodynamics study group at the Research Centre Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD) these complex interactions between electrically conductive liquids and magnetic fields are used to control the flow and solidification processes of liquid metal alloys.
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