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  • Coming to Grips with Biological Information Through Flexible Organic Electronics: Developing Bendable and Stretchable Biosensors and Device

    What do you associate with the word sensor? Perhaps technologies delivering automation in factories and other production sites? That may be what comes to mind, but advances in organic electronics are now driving the rapid development of biological sensors that measure physiological signals when in contact with the skin, organs, and other parts of the body.
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  • Semiconductor Structures with Large Differences in Hardness - Sample Preparation for SEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - In most cases, multi-layer structures or material combinations with large differences in hardness cannot be processed with conventional polishing techniques, or can only be very poorly processed. Due to the large differences in hardness, blurring or edge-rounding occurs, which distorts the original structure. In the application example shown, we are dealing with a solder ball structure. The goal was to determine the solder structure. The use of conventional grinding and polishing techniques was not possible due to the large differences in hardness between the solder ball and other materials in the sample.
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  • In-Containing Compound Semiconductors - Sample Preparation for TEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - Previous studies showed that surface accumulation of In occurs when InP was milled in a conventional way with Ar ions. The consequence is In islands on the sample surface. This leads to low quality of TEM samples. To remove these islands, reactive ion milling with iodine ions (RIBE / CAIBE) can be used. This method has the disadvantage of polluting the ion guns and the vacuum system of the ion milling device and leads to chemical reactions with the sample material. To avoid these problems we prepared these samples very gently with low energy Ar ions.
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  • How Digital Microscopy can Contribute to Efficient Workflows for Microelectronics and Electronics

    This report explains how users can benefit from the digital microscope portfolio of Leica Microsystems to attain cost-effectiveness over entire workflows in research and development (R&D), product innovation, process engineering, production, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), and failure analysis (FA).
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  • "Shallow Trench Isolation" Structures - Sample Preparation for TEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - The cross-sectional preparation of structured semiconductor materials requires a very thorough mechanical pre-preparation. In doing this, it must be ensured that the structure of interest should be located as close to the centre of the sample as possible. As the sample will be ion milled from both sides, a specific preparation of the structure is necessary in most cases, which means that you must thin these structures from both sides.
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  • Cross-Sectional Preparation of Structured Semiconductor Materials for TEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - The vertical layer construction of a semiconductor structure should be examined as a TEM cross-sectional sample. In addition to the specific preparation of the desired structure, the widely different sputter rates and atomic weights of the individual components represent the level of difficulty involved with this preparation problem.
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  • Contrast Enhancement of Polished Cross Sections of Semiconductor Structures - Sample Preparation for SEM

    Application Note for Leica EM RES102 - The surfaces of polished cross sections often show fine scratches and residues of the removed material or of the abrasive material. The artefacts are strongly material-dependent, and are mostly only detectable at higher resolutions in the scanning electron microscope. A further problem arises from the fact that the ground section mostly only has low contrast, i.e., in the structures of the semiconductor materials are very difficult to discern. With the use of ion beam milling, the ground sections of semiconductor structures can be "contrasted".
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  • Circuit board inspection

    Fast and Reliable Inspection of Printed Circuit Boards with Digital Microscopy

    Digital microscopy has been used more and more for inspection, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), failure analysis (FA), and research and development (R&D) in the microelectronics industry, especially for printed circuit boards (PCBs). Digital microscopes are practical to use and allow an efficient workflow for inspection.
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  • Inspecting and Analyzing Printed Circuit Boards Quickly and Reliably with a Digital Microscope

    For the past several years, digital microscopy has been shown to be useful for inspection, quality control and assurance (QC/QA), and failure analysis (FA) in the microelectronics industry, especially for printed circuit boards (PCBs). Recently, state-of-the-art improvements have made digital microscopy even more powerful and practical for inspection, leading to a more efficient workflow. Here, the advantages of certain digital microscope features, i.e., intuitive software for operation and analysis, fast and easy ways to change magnification, and encoding for reliable recall of parameters, are explained.
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  • TEM Sample Preparation Made Easy - Prepare TEM Specimen by Broad Beam Argon Ion Milling

    Quantitative and analytical analysis at high spatial resolution places stringent demands on the quality of the produced TEM specimens. Pristine and high-quality samples are indispensible for atomic resolution TEM analysis. In this application note a general procedure for obtaining cross-sectional and plan-view TEM specimens using the Leica EM RES102 ion milling system is outlined. The procedure described below can be easily adapted for a large range of materials e.g. thin film materials, semiconductors, multilayered materials, ceramics, superconductors, …
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  • Electron Microscopy Sample Preparation: “The Future is Cold, Dynamic and Hybrid”

    In 2014, the renowned Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT) research lab at the University Antwerp, Belgium, and Leica Microsystems started a fruitful collaboration to establish a Leica Reference Site in Antwerp. This site, officially opened in July 2014, is dedicated to specimen preparation for electron microscopy in materials science with a special focus on ion beam milling and recently also on carbon coating. In this interview Prof Gustaf van Tendeloo, Director of EMAT, and Frédéric Leroux, TEM specimen preparation specialist, talk about research topics at EMAT, how the Leica reference site has evolved, and future trends for EM sample preparation.
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  • Digital Microscopy

    Digital microscopy offers clear advantages for a large number of industrial quality inspections, particularly for surface analysis. Here, you can find some videos that show examples of application for digital microscopy.
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