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Paintings

Detail-accurate cleaning and restoration of paintings involve the use of precise digital and stereomicroscopes customized for a variety of painting types and sizes. Leica’s microscopes for paint cleaning and restoration provide variable zoom positions which enable you to work at low magnifications and analyze the tiniest details.  Floor stand options are available for larger paintings.

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Please contact us if you would like to have personal expert advice on our microscopy solutions for Paintings and Art Conservation


Top Compound Solution

Leica M60 stereomicroscope for Painting Restoration and Conservation

Analyze and restore a variety of paintings with the compact and modular Leica M60 F12 for art conservation. This 6.3:1 zoom stereomicroscope with floor stand, spotlight illumination and Leica IC80 HD camera provides the flexibility and resolution you need for cleaning and inspection of tiny details. Compact and easily configured, the Leica M60 F12 allows you to easily adapt the microscope based on your application needs.

Top Digital Solution

Leica DVM2500 digital microscope for Painting Restoration and Conservation

Inspect and clean paintings with the flexibility and access you need with the Leica DVM2500 digital microscope for museums and art restoration. This digital solution features a flexible tilting stand and revolving x/y stage so you can view the tiniest details on inclined or vertical sample surfaces.  The Leica DVM2500 also comes with Leica Application Suite software and a fast Firewire-camera for detail-accurate cleaning and restoration.


The almost life-size portrait dating from the first half of the 17th century requires extensive restoration. © Sammlungen des Fürsten von und zu Liechtenstein, Vaduz–Wien

Willem van Honthorst (1594-1666) “Portrait of a Young Man Holding a Plumed Hat in his Right Hand”

The microscope examination shows the rough granular surface of this Dutch painting which is a result of a later application of varnish with poorly dissolved components. ©Sammlungen des Fürsten von und zu Liechtenstein, Vaduz–Wien

The almost life-size portrait dating from the first half of the 17th century requires extensive restoration. The microscope examination shows the rough granular surface of this Dutch painting which is a result of a later application of varnish with poorly dissolved components. ©Sammlungen des Fürsten von und zu Liechtenstein, Vaduz–Wien