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Leica TCS SP8 DLS

LightSheet microscope Leica TCS SP8 DLS

3D Biology Workflow

Improve Your 3D Cell Biology Workflow with Digital LightSheet Microscopy.The investigation of cellular spheroids with the Leica SP8 Digital LightSheet (DLS) microscope reveals meaningful results of cellular and molecular processes in standard petri dishes and is very well suited for cancer research.

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Light Sheet Microscopy Turned Vertically

Living cells and organisms often suffer from the high light intensities used for fluorescent imaging. Light sheet microscopy reduces phototoxic effects and bleaching by illuminating a specimen in only a single plane at a time. A new light sheet microscope combines light sheet and confocal microscopy in one system without compromising either functionality and allows the combination of the two methods, e.g. confocal photomanipulation with subsequent light sheet acquisition, for new applications.

 

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"The Leica Digital Light Sheet Module – a Clever Example of Thinking Out of the Box"

Bram van den Broek is a postdoctoral fellow at the Netherlands cancer institute in Amsterdam where he supports the advanced microscopy techniques in the laboratory of Kees Jalink. Working with Leica Microsystems as a collaboration partner for beta-testing of microscopes he enjoys very much.

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Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: Beyond the Flatlands

Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LISH-M) is a true fluorescence optical sectioning technique, first described by Heinrich Siedentopf in 1902 under the name of Ultramicroscopy. Light sheet microscopy utilises a plane of light to optically section samples. This allows deep imaging within transparent tissues and whole organisms. This book chapter will provide the reader with a comprehensive view on this emerging technology.

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Video Talk by Ernst Stelzer: Light Sheet Sectioning

This talk discusses the technique of light sheet microscopy, also known as selective plane illumination (SPIM). This uses two objectives, one to illuminate the sample and a second to image it and allows long-term 3D imaging of thick specimens like developing embryos with minimal photobleaching and phototoxicity.

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Quantitative Imaging in Cell Biology: Light Sheet Microscopy

This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation.

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Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy - A Review

Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy.

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Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy Techniques in Developmental Biology

Selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) and other fluorescence microscopy techniques in which a focused sheet of light serves to illuminate the sample have become increasingly popular in developmental studies. Fluorescence light-sheet microscopy bridges the gap in image quality between fluorescence stereomicroscopy and high-resolution imaging of fixed tissue sections.

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Confocal and Digital Light Sheet Imaging

Optical imaging instrumentation can magnify tiny objects, zoom in on distant stars and reveal details that are invisible to the naked eye. But it notoriously suffers from an annoying problem: the limited depth of field. Our eye-lens (an optical imaging instrument) has the same trouble, but our brain smartly removes all not-in-focus information before the signal reaches conscious cognition.

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Nature Methods: Light-sheet Fluorescence Microscopy - Method of the Year 2014

Just about everyone who has examined fluorescent samples under the microscope is aware of the constant struggle to have enough signal to see the labeled structures while also avoiding fluorophore bleaching. What may be less apparent, at least to those who image bright, robust or fixed samples, is how stressful and potentially toxic to living cells and tissues it is to illuminate them with high-intensity light.

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