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Neuroscience

A central aspect of neuroscience is to elucidate synaptic dynamics and neural plasticity to understand how large neuronal systems function. Other studies aim on the investigation of neural disorders such as Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.

In any case, Leica Microsystem Neuroscience solutions will help you to achieve your results easier and faster. We embed our products into a complete working process and suggest proven approaches which answer your questions. 

 

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Neuronal cells

Nucleus (DAPI, blue), Tubulin (Cy3, green), Nestin (Cy5, red), DCX (Cy2, magenta). Acquired with the DMi8 S system

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Neuroscience related articles

  • FLIM FRET and Biosensors: Versatile Tools for Biomedical Research

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) in combination with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) has proven to be very beneficial for investigations in biomedical research for a wide range of structural elements and dynamic changes in cells. FRET allows to monitor molecular interactions, as the FRET signal depends strongly on the distance of the two FRET partners. This allows to investigate interaction of molecules, like ligand-receptor pairs, protein-protein interactions or interactions of effectors with DNA.
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  • Laser Microdissection Publication List

    This monthly updated reference list demonstrates the major application fields for laser microdissection in life science research.
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  • Researchers Find a “Digital” Mechanism Behind Neuronal Changes from Learning

    Neurons react to learning and memory by activating synaptic connections. The mechanisms behind this fundamental process are complex and poorly understood. Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have found that neuron plasticity operates in a “digital” fashion through nanomodules of discrete size that multiply and strengthen neuronal connections upon stimulation. This breakthrough was published on April 23rd in the journal Nature Neuroscience.
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  • Interview with Dr. Shigeki Watanabe on Research in Synaptic Membrane Dynamics

    Dr. Shigeki Watanabe, principle investigator of the department of Cell Biology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, held a workshop in Zürich, Switzerland on methods to study synaptic dynamics with millisecond precision. In collaboration with Dr. Andres Käch from the University of Zurich all workshop attendees enjoyed presentations and hands-on sessions on the EM ICE by Leica Microsystems with Light and Electrical Stimulation, revealing the latest developments in brain research. During this workshop Dr. Bernd Sägmüller from Leica Microsystems had the chance for an interview with Dr. Watanabe.
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  • Quantitative Analysis of PPT1 Interactome in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Application example of HyVolution Super-Resolution - Mutations in the CLN1 gene that encodes Palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1) or CLN1, cause Infantile NCL (INCL, MIM#256730). PPT1 removes long fatty acid chains such as palmitate from modified cysteine residues of proteins. The data shown here result from isolated protein complexes from PPT1-expressing SH-SY5Y stable cells that were subjected to single step affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS). Prior to the MS analysis, we utilised a modified filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) protocol. Based on label free quantitative analysis of the data by SAINT, 23 PPT1 interacting partners (IP) were identified.
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  • Botulinum Neurotoxin Type-A Enters a Non-Recycling Pool of Synaptic Vesicles

    Neuronal communication relies on synaptic vesicles undergoing regulated exocytosis and recycling for multiple rounds of fusion. Whether all synaptic vesicles have identical protein content has been challenged, suggesting that their recycling ability may differ greatly. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that is internalized in synaptic vesicles at motor nerve terminals and induces flaccid paralysis. Recently, BoNT/A was also shown to undergo retrograde transport, suggesting it might enter a specific pool of synaptic vesicles with a retrograde trafficking fate. Using high-resolution microscopy techniques including electron microscopy and single molecule imaging, we found that the BoNT/A binding domain is internalized within a subset of vesicles that only partially co-localize with cholera toxin B-subunit and have markedly reduced VAMP2 immunoreactivity.
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  • C. Elegans

    Work Efficiently in Developmental Biology with Stereo and Confocal Microscopy: C. elegans

    For scientists, technicians, and teachers working with the worm C. elegans in the research lab or classroom, this report is intended to give useful information to help improve their daly work. The aim is to make the work steps of worm picking, transgenesis, RNA interference, screening, and functional imaging efficient. It also details the various possibilities for equipping a research worm lab or biology classroom/teaching lab explaining worm methods.
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  • Freeze-Fracture Replication of Pyramidal Cells

    Application Note for Leica EM HPM100 - Frozen samples (90 μm thick slices frozen by HPM100) were inserted into a double replica table and then fractured into two pieces at –130°C (after insertion of the tissue into BAF 060 the samples should be left in the chamber for 20 min to reach the –130°C).
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  • Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    Application Note for Leica EM ICE - Rat Hippocampal neurons, cultured on 50 μm thick Aclar (Aclar embedding film, EMS) for 19 days, were frozen in the 100 μm deep side of lecithin coated (detailed protocol Appendix I) type A 3 mm Cu/Au carriers (Leica) and sandwiched with the flat side of lecithin coated type B 3 mm Cu/Au carriers (Leica). No additional filler was used, only cell culture medium with the addition of Hepes buffer pH 7.2 to a final concentration of 25 mM. Samples were frozen in a high-pressure freezer (Leica EM ICE).
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  • Label-free in vivo Imaging of Myelinated Axons in Health and Disease with Spectral Confocal Reflectance Microscopy

    We report a new technique for high-resolution in vivo imaging of myelinated axons in the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve that requires no fluorescent labeling. This method, based on spectral confocal reflectance microscopy (SCoRe), uses a conventional laser scanning confocal system to generate images by merging the simultaneously reflected signals from multiple lasers of different wavelengths.
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  • Individual Macromolecule Motion in a Crowded Living Cell

    There is solid evidence for analyzing fluorescence correlation and dual color fluorescence crosscorrelation spectroscopy data ( FCS and dual color FCCS) in cellular applications by equations based on anomalous subdiffusion. Using equations based on normal diffusion causes artifacts of the fitted biological system response parameters and of the interpretations of the FCS and dual color FCCS data in the crowded environment of living cells. Equations based on normal diffusion are not valid in living cells. The original article embraces the status of the experimental situation and touches obstacles that still hinder the applications of single molecules in the cellular environment.
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  • Super-Resolution Mapping of Neuronal Circuitry With an Index-Optimized Clearing Agent

    Super-resolution imaging deep inside tissues has been challenging, as it is extremely sensitive to light scattering and spherical aberrations. Here, we report an optimized optical clearing agent for high-resolution fluorescence imaging (SeeDB2). SeeDB2 matches the refractive indices of fixed tissues to that of immersion oil (1.518), thus minimizing both light scattering and spherical aberrations.
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  • Mammary gland development

    Investigating the Influence of Hormone Signaling Pathways on Mammary Gland Development and the Onset of Breast Cancer

    Over their entire lifetime, 1 out of 8 women can suffer from breast cancer. The risk of developing breast cancer (mammary carcinogenesis) increases with a woman’s age and is related to her reproductive history. The chance of mammary carcinogenesis is less for women who give birth to a child before the age of 30. However, it is now known that the risk of breast cancer also can depend on the number of times a woman experiences elevated blood serum progesterone levels, in relation to the menstrual cycle, before her first pregnancy.
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  • Super-Resolution Microscopy of the Synaptic Active Zone

    At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialized proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Recently, super-resolution microscopy (SRM) techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how SRM techniques can be used to obtain information on the organization of AZ proteins.
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  • Workflows & Protocols: Connecting Microscopy and Molecular Biology in Neuroscience

    The main topic during this course was how to apply laser microdissection in neuroscience. Leica specialists demonstrated why laser microdissection is a suitable techniques for brain investigation as it allows to separate distinct brain layers or even to isolate individual neurons.
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