David R. Barbero , PhD

David R. Barbero

Dr. David R. Barbero is an engineer and physicist who has over 15 years of experience in nanoscale opto-electronic materials, devices and displays. His work has been published in several top journals in Materials Science and Physics and highlighted in over 300 scientific newspapers and internet websites. He has a long experience in nano-patterning and nano-structuring of polymers and composites (optical lithography, nano-imprinting, colloidal, nanotubes, and polymer self-assembly). David obtained his PhD in Physics at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, UK, where he was a Marie-Curie Fellow, a European Cambridge Trust Scholar, and he was awarded the Abdus Salam runner-up prize in Physics from Cambridge University in 2009.

Chicken-embryo cross section at the level of the midbrain showing neural crest cells and cadherin-6B molecules. Raw widefield data (top) and THUNDER image (bottom).

The Neural Crest (NC)

This article discusses how the study of neural crest (NC) development in chicken embryos is aided with haze-free imaging using a THUNDER Imager 3D Assay. Proper specification, migration, and…
Raw widefield and THUNDER image of transversal mouse adult fiber lens section. Courtesy N. Houssin, Plagemen lab, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA.

Studying Ocular Birth Defects

This article discusses how lens formation and ocular birth defects can be studied with sharp widefield microscopy images which are acquired rapidly. The mouse ocular lens is used as a model to study…
THUNDER image of early prophase Drosophila germarium.

Healthy Oocyte Development

This article discusses how the study of mechanisms involved in the generation of healthy oocytes in Drosophila fruit flies can be helped with sharp, haze-free images acquired with a THUNDER Imager…
The various solutions from Leica Microsystems for cleanliness analysis.

Factors to Consider for a Cleanliness Analysis Solution

Choosing the right cleanliness analysis solution is important for optimal quality control. This article discusses the important factors that should be taken into account to find the solution that best…
Chicken cochlea tissue imaged with a THUNDER Imager using large volume computational clearing. Courtesy of Dr. Amanda Janesick, California, USA.

Development and Recovery of the Inner Ear

This article discusses how thick cochlear tissues of chicken embryos can be sharply imaged for studying inner-ear hair cell regeneration. Sensory hair cells perform important functions for hearing and…
Particles and fibers on a filter which will be counted and analyzed for cleanliness

Efficient Particle Counting and Analysis

This report discusses particle counting and analysis using optical microscopy for cleanliness of parts and components. Particle counting and analysis is a critical part of quality assurance in the…
Particles which could be found during cleanliness analysis of parts and components.

Cleanliness of Automotive Components and Parts

This article discusses the ISO 16232 standard and VDA 19 guidelines and briefly summarizes the particle analysis methods. They give important criteria for the cleanliness of automotive parts and…
Raw widefield and THUNDER image of a mouse aorta

Molecular Mechanisms of Vascular Disease

This article discusses how the lamina, vascular cells, and nuclei of mouse aorta are more clearly resolved with a THUNDER Imager Tissue using Computational Clearing (CC) compared to conventional…
Macroscopic extended depth of field images of C. elegans

Autophagy and Age-Related Pathologies

High-contrast imaging of the model organism C. elegans, a nematode, with the THUNDER Imager Model Organism using Small Volume Computational Clearing (SVCC) helps to better understand how autophagy and…
Electronic component

Top Challenges for Visual Inspection

This article discusses the challenges encountered when performing visual inspection and rework using a microscope. Using the right type of microscope and optical setup is paramount in order to…

How to select the right solution for visual inspection

This article helps users with the decision-making process when selecting a microscope as a solution for routine visual inspection. Important factors that should be considered are described.
Maximum intensity projection of undecalcified mouse bone tissue expressing GFP (green) and tdTomato (red) and stained with Hoechst 33342 (blue). Imaged using a THUNDER Imager Tissue: A) raw data and B) with ICC.

Localizing Bone Stem Cells In Vivo

This article demonstrates how undecalcified mouse bone samples can be investigated in detail more easily and rapidly with a cryohistological method used in combination with a THUNDER Imager Tissue and…

Role of Mucins and Glycosylation in Dry Eye Disease

This article shows how fast, high-contrast, and sharp imaging of stratified human corneal epithelial cells with THUNDER imaging technology for dry eye disease (DED) research allows membrane ridges to…
Images of C2C12 cells which were stained with lamin B (magenta), Hoechst (blue), and yH2AX (yellow). A) raw widefield fluorescence image and B) THUNDER image after LVCC. The yellow foci indicate damaged DNA.

Skeletal Muscle Adaptation and Fibrotic Diseases

The mechanisms of how skeletal muscle adapts to fibrotic pathologies can be investigated more efficiently with fast, high-contrast imaging of C2C12 mouse myoblast cells which is described in this…

Introduction to 21 CFR Part 11 and Related Regulations

This article provides an overview of regulations and guidelines for electronic records (data entry, storage, signatures, and approvals) used in the USA (21 CFR Part 11), EU (GMP Annex 11), and China…
THUNDER image of a section of mouse lung where the mouse was inoculated with the Puerto Rico 8 strain of influenza virus. The lung tissue was immunofluorescently stained with Keratin-5 (green) and PDL-1 (red). Image courtesy of Andrew Beppu, Stripp Lab, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, USA.

Monitoring Immunosuppressive Mechanisms from Infection

This application note discusses the importance of fast, sensitive, and haze-free imaging for the monitoring of immunosuppression in mouse lung epithelial tissue infected with the Puerto Rico 8…
Images of a brain organoid derived from iPSCs acquired with a THUNDER Imager 3D Cell Culture. The cells were infected with the pAAV-hSyn-EGFP and pLX-hGFAP-mCherry virus. The image is the 36th plane cropped out of a 53 plane Z-stack volume. Shown are both the A) raw widefield image and B) the same image after Large Volume Computation Clearing (LVCC). Neurons are labeled in green and astrocytes in red.

“Brains-In-A-Dish” from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)

This article discusses the benefits of using the THUNDER technology for imaging inside 3D human cortical brain organoids. These organoids are derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)…

Why is Manual Visual Inspection of Medical Devices so Challenging?

This article discusses how manual visual inspection, which is prevalent in the medical device industry, can lead to inconsistent results. It also addresses the challenges quality managers and…
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